The Consequences of Not Enough Zinc

By , Category : General Health

Disclaimer: Results are not guaranteed*** and may vary from person to person***.

Consequences of Not Enough ZincZinc is an essential nutrient needed for a long, long list of bodily processes. A new study, on animals, has shown for the first time how zinc deficiency can happen with age—and what it can lead to. This includes inflammation, cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and autoimmune disease.

The health breakthrough is out of Oregon State University. It suggests that it’s especially important for elderly people to get adequate dietary intake of zinc—since their levels of the mineral may naturally be declining.

RECOMMENDED: Boost Your Immune System with Zinc

Four in 10 older U.S. adults maintain a diet that is deficient in zinc, making it an underappreciated micronutrient. Researchers found that older animals had seriously disrupted “zinc transporters.” They showed signs of zinc deficiency and had signs of more inflammation even when their diet had adequate amounts of zinc. When these animals received 10 times their dietary requirement for zinc, the levels of inflammation dropped down to those of a younger age.

Many studies have shown that zinc deficiency can cause DNA damage. Now we know it can trigger widespread inflammation. Excessive inflammation is a very serious problem, linked to a wide range of degenerative diseases. That includes cancer and heart disease. Thus, inflammation is at the root of diseases that the majority of us die from.

To protect against this, older adults must pay more attention to the amount of zinc they are getting. Since our bodies don’t absorb it from food as well when we are older, experts recommend all aging adults pop a supplement that includes the full recommended daily allowance for zinc. That is 11 milligrams a day for men and eight for women. In food, seafood and meat are highest in zinc, but we don’t absorb it as well from grains and vegetables.

Zinc is essential to protect against oxidative stress and help repair DNA damage. With too little zinc, the body’s ability to repair genetic damage may be decreasing even as the amount of damage is going up. And, that is the process by which cancer begins. Tests for zinc deficiency are not commonly done, so it is up to you to ensure you are getting enough of this mineral each day.

Importantly, do not ever take over 40 milligrams of zinc a day. At high levels, it interferes with absorption of other necessary nutrients, such as iron and copper.




WANT MORE HEALTH NEWS & UPDATES?
Sign up for the latest health news, tips and special product offers with our daily Free e-Letters, the Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin and the Health eTalk with the Bel Marra Doctors.

Opt-in by entering your e-mail address below and clicking submit. Your e-mail will never be shared, sold or rented to anyone for promotional or advertising purposes, and you can unsubscribe easily at any time.

Yes, I’m opting in for the FREE Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin and
Health eTalk with the Bel Marra Doctors:

Doctors Health Press Editorial Team

About the Author, Browse Doctors Health Press Editorial Team's Articles

Doctors Health Press publishes daily health articles and monthly health newsletters for a wide array of alternative and natural health topics like healing foods, homeopathic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, hidden cures for common illnesses, and natural self-healing. Doctors Health Press also publishes books and reports that provide timely health breakthroughs, always focusing on natural and alternative health. Topics include omega health, prostate health, natural weight loss, natural diabetes cures, heart health, stroke prevention, secret herbal cures, vision health, anti-aging, sexual... Read Full Bio »